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Why Doesn’t Bloomberg Businessweek Cover Women?

businessweek107 issues. More than 2 years. That’s how long it’s been since Bloomberg Businessweek has featured a female businessperson on its cover. You have to go back to May 16, 2011 when Sheryl Sandberg was featured to find a female executive who made the grade.

Who did make the cover during that period? Tim Cook, Rupert Murdoch (twice), Ben Bernanke, Bill (but not Hillary) Clinton, Sergey Brin, Reed Hastings, Mitt Romney, Jamie Dimon, Robert Rubin, Steve Ballmer, Timothy Geithner, Steve Jobs (after death, twice), David Einhorn, Jeff Bezos, Jerry Brown, Vladimir Putin, Muammar Gaddafi, Mark Zuckerberg, Jesus, Alpha Dads, zombies, HP printers (but not CEO Meg Whitman), a guy standing inside a baby bottle, Alan Simpson, Erskine Bowles, Kim Dotcom, R2 D2, Mickey Mouse (sans Minnie), the Twitter bird, two commercial airliners getting it on and, well, you get the idea.

So far in 2013, the only woman on a cover of Businessweek was a half naked model used to promote a story about photo app Snapchat. 2012 was even worse for women, when the only female featured was an elderly woman in a Walmart mask.

Non-whites (other than President Barrack Obama) haven’t fared much better. A February 2013 cover illustration about housing was deemed so racist that Businessweek later apologized.

The lack of coverage of the revolution happening in business today—particularly among Millennial women and minorities who are transforming the workplace—is unfortunate. Surely there are some new, cover-worthy stories that deserve to be told.

In the meantime, as a current subscriber, I’ll be disappointed each week when the cover of Businessweek downloads to my iPad only to ignore half of today’s workforce.

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